3 WOMEN
1977, 20th Century Fox, 124 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Director Robert Altman’s dazzlingly brilliant study of three different women who have more in common than one initially imagines, with everything from consumer culture to macho role-playing skewered as the narrative unfolds. Clueless but sweet Millie (Shelley Duvall), working at a convalescent resort, takes young, naive Pinky (Sissy Spacek) under her wing, and both become gradually caught up in the strange relationship between reclusive artist Willie (Janice Rule) and her husband (Robert Fortier, who seems to be channeling Hunter S. Thompson). Fascinatingly offbeat and at times frightening, as the heart of the characters’ lives is stripped bare to reveal a quirky core as empty and arid as their desert community.


ANNIE HALL
1977, Park Circus, 93 min, USA, Dir: Woody Allen

Director Woody Allen stars as neurotic comedian Alvy Singer in this Oscar-winning comedy classic, in which he leads the viewer through the ups and downs of his relationship with Annie Hall (Diane Keaton) to explore what led to its demise. Bursting with comic bravura and insights into love among the neurotics, ANNIE HALL deservedly walked off with the Oscars for Best Picture, Best Actress (Diane Keaton), Best Director and Best Original Screenplay (Allen and Marshall Brickman), plus a nomination for Best Actor (Woody Allen). With Tony Roberts, Paul Simon, Shelley Duvall and Carol Kane.


THE SHINING
1980, Warner Bros., 142 min, USA, Dir: Stanley Kubrick

Jack Nicholson takes a job as winter caretaker at an enormous mountain hotel, where he goes with wife Shelley Duvall and son Danny Lloyd in the hope that snow and solitude will bring him peace of mind. He finds just the opposite, however, as the hotel’s horrific past quickly overtakes him.


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