IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK
2018, Annapurna Pictures, 119 min, USA, Dir: Barry Jenkins

Set in early-1970s Harlem, this adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel is a timeless and moving love story of both a couple’s unbreakable bond and the African-American family’s empowering embrace, as told through the eyes of 19-year-old Tish Rivers (newcomer KiKi Layne). She dreams of a future with her artist fiancé, Fonny (Stephan James), but the couple’s plans are derailed when the young man is arrested for a crime he did not commit. As Fonny’s weeks in prison turn to months, Tish draws upon inner strength and the unwavering support of her family to face the challenges of life without her partner at her side and the imminent arrival of the couple’s child. “In BEALE STREET as in MOONLIGHT, the director melds color, music and portraiture to do more than tell a story. By the time he’s finished, he seems to have transcended the conventional tools of filmmaking to work with pure emotion itself.” - Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post.


VICE
2018, Annapurna Pictures, 132 min, Dir: Adam McKay

Spanning a half-century, Dick Cheney’s (Christian Bale) complex journey from rural Wyoming electrical worker to de facto president of the United States is a darkly comic and often unsettling inside look at the use and misuse of institutional power. Guided by his formidable and unfailingly loyal wife, Lynne (Amy Adams), and mentored by the brusque and blustery Donald Rumsfeld (Steve Carell), Cheney insinuated himself into the Washington, D.C., fabric beginning with the Nixon administration. In 2000, he left his position as CEO of Halliburton to run as vice president to George W. Bush (Sam Rockwell) with the implicit understanding that he would exercise almost unchecked control. Cheney’s cunning and furtive political maneuvering have altered the American political landscape in ways that will continue to reverberate for decades to come, but it is clear there is more than one Dick Cheney - a man whose reputation in the public sector belies his private life and obvious devotion to his family.


THE SISTERS BROTHERS
2018, Annapurna Pictures, 121 min, France/Spain/Romania/USA, Dir: Jacques Audiard

Based on the novel by Patrick deWitt, this reimagining of the cinematic Western is a dangerous, witty and emotionally cathartic exploration of what it means to be a man. It is 1851, and Charlie and Eli Sisters (Joaquin Phoenix and John C. Reilly) are both brothers and assassins, boys grown to men in a savage and hostile world. Each increasingly questions, and quibbles with, the other’s methods as they travel through the mountains of Oregon and eventually to the Gold Rush land of California. It’s a journey that will test the deadly family ties that bind - and may allow them to rediscover what remains of their humanity. Costarring Jake Gyllenhaal and Riz Ahmed. “This first English-language outing by the ever-adventurous French director Jacques Audiard (A PROPHET, RUST AND BONE) is a connoisseur’s delight, as it's boisterously acted and detailed down to its last bit of shirt stitching.” - Todd McCarthy, The Hollywood Reporter.


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