THE FILE ON THELMA JORDON
1950, Paramount, 100 min, Dir: Robert Siodmak

Barbara Stanwyck is an ambiguous femme fatale who ensnares a lovelorn assistant D.A. (Wendell Corey) in a murder scheme. Ketti Frings’ screenplay imbues a traditional noir recipe with a genuine sense of longing and loss. This was Siodmak’s next-to-last film before abandoning Hollywood, and we’re thrilled to give it a rare theatrical screening. With Paul Kelly, Stanley Ridges, and Richard Rober.


CEASE FIRE
1953, Kino Lorber, 75 min, USA, Dir: Owen Crump

This unique and unforgettable war documentary (one of the first of its kind in 3-D) features real American soldiers re-enacting a Korean War operation as Lieutenant Thompson and 13 others in his platoon face countless hurdles that all lead to a harrowing finale. The re-enactments are spliced with real battle footage from the mission that blurs the line between reality and fiction. The New York Times called it “a robust, hair-raising realization of the ruggedness of the foot soldiers’ war in the ugly hills of Korea.”


THE PETRIFIED FOREST
1936, Warner Bros., 83 min, USA, Dir: Archie Mayo

Based on the Robert E. Sherwood play, this hard-edged drama stars Humphrey Bogart, Bette Davis and Leslie Howard as strangers whose lives collide with deadly results in a small desert town on the edge of Arizona’s petrified forest. Disillusioned British intellectual Alan Squier (Howard) meets young Gabby Maple (Davis), who sees him as her ticket to Paris and to her dreams. Squier hopes she succeeds but plans to leave alone - a plan that ends abruptly when gangster Duke Mantee (Bogart) takes them hostage.


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