THE ADVENTURES OF FORD FAIRLANE
1990, 20th Century Fox, 104 min, USA, Dir: Renny Harlin

Andrew Dice Clay found a movie character perfect for his larger-than-life persona in Ford Fairlane, a “rock ‘n’ roll detective” catering to the music industry from behind the wheel of a 1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner. With an arsenal of off-color one-liners, Ford confronts a motley crew of musicians, shock-jocks, groupies and label executives to solve the on-stage murder of a heavy metal singer; among the many cameos in this cult favorite are memorable turns by Vince Neil, Gilbert Gottfried, Wayne Newton, Priscilla Presley and NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET baddie Robert Englund.


A HARD DAY’S NIGHT
1964, Janus Films, 85 min, UK, Dir: Richard Lester

Director Richard Lester's brilliant, carefree comedy set the tone for the rest of the 1960s and captured The Beatles at their best, clowning (as one respected reviewer said) like the new Marx Bros. From Lester's restless, handheld camerawork to writer Alun Owen's surreal, day-in-the-life script and George Martin's sprightly score (both Oscar-nominated) to the Beatles themselves - exuberantly singing “Can't Buy Me Love,” “She Loves You” and 10 other Beatles classics - this is the essence of the ’60s.


WOODSTOCK (The Director's Cut)
1970, Warner Bros., 228 min, USA, Dir: Michael Wadleigh

In THE OMEGA MAN, it’s no wonder that Charlton Heston, sole survivor of the human race, spends his days endlessly watching WOODSTOCK, the ultimate time capsule of the Love Generation. If any film captured the heady idealism, the free-form partying, drug-taking and love-making, and above all the great music of the late 1960s, this is it. The Who, Crosby, Stills & Nash, Sly & The Family Stone, Richie Havens, Joan Baez, Joe Cocker, Carlos Santana - need we say more? We’ll be screening the much-extended Director’s Cut of the film, featuring many songs and performers not included in the original release version.


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