MADE IN U.S.A.
1966, Rialto Pictures, 85 min, France, Dir: Jean-Luc Godard

Paula Nelson (Anna Karina, in her final Godard film) arrives in Atlantic-Cité from Paris to find out that her former lover and colleague has died. As she investigates, bodies start dropping amid encounters with a gangster and the waters just keep getting muddier. Keep your eyes peeled for a brief but memorable appearance by singer Marianne Faithfull.


IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK
2018, Annapurna Pictures, 119 min, USA, Dir: Barry Jenkins

Set in early-1970s Harlem, this adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel is a timeless and moving love story of both a couple’s unbreakable bond and the African-American family’s empowering embrace, as told through the eyes of 19-year-old Tish Rivers (newcomer KiKi Layne). She dreams of a future with her artist fiancé, Fonny (Stephan James), but the couple’s plans are derailed when the young man is arrested for a crime he did not commit. As Fonny’s weeks in prison turn to months, Tish draws upon inner strength and the unwavering support of her family to face the challenges of life without her partner at her side and the imminent arrival of the couple’s child. “In BEALE STREET as in MOONLIGHT, the director melds color, music and portraiture to do more than tell a story. By the time he’s finished, he seems to have transcended the conventional tools of filmmaking to work with pure emotion itself.” - Ann Hornaday, The Washington Post.


CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?
2018, Fox Searchlight, 106 min, USA, Dir: Marielle Heller

Melissa McCarthy stars in the adaptation of the memoir CAN YOU EVER FORGIVE ME?, the true story of best-selling celebrity biographer (and friend to cats) Lee Israel, who made her living in the 1970s and '80s profiling the likes of Katharine Hepburn, Tallulah Bankhead, Estee Lauder and journalist Dorothy Kilgallen. When Lee is no longer able to get published because she has fallen out of step with current tastes, she turns her art form to deception, abetted by her loyal friend Jack (Richard E. Grant). “It is a fiercely composed, historically informed, and richly textured film, as insightful regarding the particularities of the protagonist as it is on the artistic life - and on the life of its times.” - Richard Brody, The New Yorker.


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