THE PINK PANTHER
1964, Park Circus/MGM, 113 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

Writer-director Blake Edwards introduced Peter Sellers’ absolutely clueless Inspector Jacques Clouseau with this comedy about a British jewel thief and playboy (David Niven) on a ski holiday with nephew Robert Wagner, mistress Capucine, exotic princess Claudia Cardinale and a priceless diamond in tow.


HAROLD AND MAUDE
1971, Paramount, 91 min, Dir: Hal Ashby

Producer Robert Evans fought hard for nonconformist editor-turned-filmmaker Hal Ashby to be allowed to direct this wildly offbeat romance between suicidal youngster Bud Cort and eccentric, 80-year-old Ruth Gordon. The result is one of the most poignant and subversive films of the New Hollywood era.


GROUNDHOG DAY
1993, Sony Pictures, 101 min, Dir: Harold Ramis

Self-absorbed weatherman Bill Murray is caught in a freakish time loop, doomed to repeat the same Groundhog Day over and over again until he gets things right. Director Harold Ramis concocts an existential comedy that is funny, intelligent and positively Punxsutawney. With Andie MacDowell, Chris Elliot.


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