S.O.B.
1981, Warner Bros., 122 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

When director Richard Mulligan's expensive musical turns out to be a flop, he decides to recut it as an erotic epic that will exploit the squeaky-clean image of star Julie Andrews. This hilarious and trenchant satire has echoes of Edwards' own experiences making DARLING LILI, but its comedy reaches beyond mere score-settling to present a mercilessly funny - and at times surprisingly sweet - poison-pen love letter to the American cinema. The great supporting cast includes William Holden, Robert Webber, Robert Vaughn, Larry Hagman (J.R. of "Dallas") and a very young Rosanna Arquette.


THE PARTY
1968, MGM Repertory, 99 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

For most of its length, THE PARTY is a wonderfully restrained homage to Jacques Tati, with Peter Sellers in perfect pitch as an awestruck Indian actor who disrupts a chic Hollywood gathering with the help of French songbird Claudine Longet and an elephant. The final 15 minutes prove that any great joke deserves a totally outrageous punchline. Look for Steve Franken as an inebriated waiter and Denny Miller as a hilarious rhinestone cowboy


A SHOT IN THE DARK
1964, MGM Repertory, 99 min, Dir: Blake Edwards

Blake Edwards’ follow-up to THE PINK PANTHER is a non-stop barrage of pratfalls, sight gags and linguistic nonsense, courtesy of Inspector Clouseau (Peter Sellers). Everything seems freshly minted, from Herbert Lom’s hysterics as Chief Inspector Dreyfus to Burt Kwouk’s first appearance as Cato.


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