SAFETY LAST!
1923, Janus Films, 73 min, USA, Dir: Fred C. Newmeyer, Sam Taylor

The comic genius of silent star Harold Lloyd is eternal. Chaplin is the sweet innocent, Keaton the stoic outsider, but Lloyd - the modern guy striving for success - is us. And with its torrent of perfectly executed gags and astonishing stunts, SAFETY LAST! is the perfect introduction to him. Lloyd plays a small-town bumpkin trying to make it in the big city, who finds employment as a lowly department-store clerk. He comes up with a wild publicity stunt to draw attention to the store, resulting in an incredible feat of derring-do on his part that gets him started on the climb to success – a climb that results in one of the most iconic images in film history, as Lloyd dangles from a clock high above the streets of Los Angeles.


BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER
1992, 20th Century Fox, 86 min, USA, Dir: Fran Rubel Kuzui

Writer Joss Whedon would bring Buffy and friends to television with even greater success five years later but this big-screen original remains loads of fun. Spoiled L.A. teen Buffy Summers (Kristy Swanson) is skeptical when an older man named Merrick (Donald Sutherland) tells her that she’s destined to kill the undead, but when vampire leader Lothos (Rutger Hauer) and his deputy (Paul Reubens, in a very effective turn from his Pee-wee Herman persona) cross her path, Buffy goes into action. Luke Perry costars as her eventual ally, with an impressive array of future stars (including Hilary Swank and an uncredited Ben Affleck) joining them in the halls of Hemery High School.


LET THE SUNSHINE IN
UN BEAU SOLEIL INTÉRIEUR
2017, IFC Films/Sundance Selects, 94 min, France/Belgium, Dir: Claire Denis

Shedding the blood and guts but none of the stinging bite of her previous work on male-female relationships, Claire Denis’ LET THE SUNSHINE IN is a surprisingly caustic romantic comedy about a woman’s search for true love. Taking a narrative stab at French philosopher Roland Barthes’ 1977 book, A Lover's Discourse: Fragments, Denis and screenwriter-novelist Christine Angot examine a woman’s troubled love life as she finds little success beyond carnal gratification. Juliette Binoche plays the frustrated Isabelle, in one of her most riveting performances. “A simple story of enormous complexity. A romantic comedy and drama in which the questioning of those very categories is a part of the action ... a peculiarly insightful glimpse into the emotional fluidity within the formal boundaries of French culture.” - Richard Brody – The New Yorker.


Syndicate content