3 WOMEN
1977, 20th Century Fox, 124 min, USA, Dir: Robert Altman

Director Robert Altman’s dazzlingly brilliant study of three different women who have more in common than one initially imagines, with everything from consumer culture to macho role-playing skewered as the narrative unfolds. Clueless but sweet Millie (Shelley Duvall), working at a convalescent resort, takes young, naive Pinky (Sissy Spacek) under her wing, and both become gradually caught up in the strange relationship between reclusive artist Willie (Janice Rule) and her husband (Robert Fortier, who seems to be channeling Hunter S. Thompson). Fascinatingly offbeat and at times frightening, as the heart of the characters’ lives is stripped bare to reveal a quirky core as empty and arid as their desert community.


COAL MINER’S DAUGHTER
1980, Universal, 125 min, USA, Dir: Michael Apted

Sissy Spacek turns in an Oscar-winning performance as Loretta Lynn, who rises from poverty to become one of the most popular country singers of all time. The Band’s Levon Helm makes his film acting debut as father to Lynn and her seven siblings, and Tommy Lee Jones excels as Lynn's troubled manager and husband, who drives his wife to success but has a hard time dealing with the end result.


CARRIE
1976, Park Circus/MGM, 97 min, USA, Dir: Brian De Palma

Brian De Palma strikes exactly the right note between empathy and horror in this yarn of Carrie (Sissy Spacek), a teen misfit who becomes so unglued after being repeatedly victimized by sadistic classmates and religious-zealot mom Piper Laurie that her latent telekinetic powers kick in, resulting in a blitz of gory, vengeful carnage. Enormously popular on its original release, CARRIE remains one of the best adaptations from a Stephen King novel. With John Travolta, Amy Irving, Nancy Allen and P.J. Soles.


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