SABOTEUR
1942, Universal, 108 min, USA, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock transfers the successful formula of his British films to Hollywood by telling yet another story of a falsely accused man on the run. This time it’s Robert Cummings as Barry Kane, an aircraft worker who is blamed for an explosion at his factory. As Kane hunts down the real saboteurs, Hitchcock uses his familiar chase structure to justify slyly satirical musings on patriotism and its flipside, paranoid ideas that culminate in the wonderful climax set on top of the Statue of Liberty. Norman Lloyd co-stars as one of the most wickedly engaging villains in the Hitchcock oeuvre.


DIAL M FOR MURDER
1954, Warner Bros., 105 min, Dir: Alfred Hitchcock

Suave, cold-blooded Ray Milland plots to murder his beautiful wife (Grace Kelly) and leaves the key to their apartment outside for his hired killer (Anthony Dawson). When the killer has a bit of trouble - to put it mildly - with a pair of scissors, a new Pandora’s box of complications opens up. Unfortunately, scheming Milland may still be able to pull off his plan - that is, unless Kelly’s old flame, Robert Cummings, and unflappable Scotland Yard inspector John Williams can determine what really happened that fateful night. Maestro Hitchcock masterfully adapts Frederick Knott’s hit stage play to the big screen (it was originally presented in 3-D).


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