HANNAH AND HER SISTERS
1986, Park Circus/MGM, 103 min, USA, Dir: Woody Allen

Woody Allen’s brilliant romantic comedy set in New York City over a Thanksgiving holiday follows well-adjusted Hannah (Mia Farrow) and her slightly lost siblings Lee (Barbara Hershey) and Holly (Dianne Wiest), all playing virtual musical chairs with a gang of lovers (including Allen, Michael Caine, Max Von Sydow and Sam Waterston). With Lloyd Nolan and Margaret Sullivan (Mia’s real-life mom) as the women’s nostalgically careening parents, and Carrie Fisher as Holly’s poisonous best friend April. Winner of three Academy Awards, two for Best Supporting performances (Caine and Weist) and Best Screenplay for Allen.


THE GREAT GATSBY
1974, Paramount, 144 min, USA, Dir: Jack Clayton

“Gone is the romance that was so divine.” Director Jack Clayton (THE INNOCENTS) directs Francis Ford Coppola's screenplay adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic novel about the tarnished and tragic American dream, Robert Redford excels as the ill-fated, hopelessly determined Jay Gatsby, while Mia Farrow plays the sweet but poisonous Daisy Buchanan, with Bruce Dern as her bullying husband, Tom. Theoni V. Aldredge received an Oscar for her glittering 1920s costume design, while Nelson Riddle received an Oscar for Best Original Score.


ROSEMARY’S BABY
1968, Paramount, 136 min, USA, Dir: Roman Polanski

A young New York couple (Mia Farrow and John Cassavetes) move into a new apartment building, where they’re quickly befriended by lovable Ruth Gordon and husband Sidney Blackmer. All is not as it seems, though, and Farrow soon comes to suspect that her neighbors have truly sinister plans in store for her and her unborn baby. This eerie supernatural thriller builds shivery atmosphere through each successive scene, right up until the shattering climax.


Syndicate content