THE CHANGELING
1980, Joel B. Michaels/Garth Drabinsky Productions, 109 min, USA, Dir: Peter Medak

Director Peter Medak’s superb ghost story has been recently rediscovered for what it is: one of the most chillingly effective portraits of the supernatural made in the past 30 years. George C. Scott stars as a musician, grieving over the recent deaths of his wife and daughter, who moves into a drafty old mansion - only to find it inhabited by the spirit of a young and very restless ghost.


THE HINDENBURG
1975, Universal, 125 min, USA, Dir: Robert Wise

Director Robert Wise helmed this film about the Hindenburg conflagration, touched off when the German zeppelin landed in Lakehurst, New Jersey in 1937. George C. Scott is a conflicted German security officer aboard, Anne Bancroft is a wayward countess, William Atherton (DAY OF THE LOCUST) a possible saboteur, Roy Thinnes (TV’s "The Invaders") a fanatical Gestapo officer and Charles Durning (DOG DAY AFTERNOON) the Hindenburg’s captain. Recipient of two Oscars for Special Achievement in Sound Effects (Peter Berkos) and Visual Effects (Albert Whitlock, Glen Robinson).


THE NEW CENTURIONS
1972, Sony Repertory, 103 min, USA, Dir: Richard Fleischer

Director Richard Fleischer brings his usual straightforward approach to this underrated adaptation of former cop-turned-author Joseph Wambaugh’s bestseller. George C. Scott is excellent as the seasoned police veteran who shepherds young newcomer Stacy Keach in the ways of the street. Initially hoping to support himself by police work until he gets his degree, law student Keach is gradually worn down by the pitiless grind and lets go of his ambition and family (including wife Jane Alexander). The job likewise takes its toll on Scott, but he is better at keeping his emotions hidden – until it is too late.


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